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There's a Connection between Loneliness and Political Censorship

Updated: Sep 21, 2023

Ask yourself this: If you cannot speak openly to people, can you develop relationships? Not really anything beyond the shallow. If you are always terrified of saying something "politically correct" and therefore constantly self-censor, how easily can you get to know anyone? Not very easily. When a government puts up roadblocks to open conversation, people become more atomized, more socially isolated, and therefore more lonely.

My piece in today's Daily Caller considers all of this in light of Gov. Ron DeSantis's call for a "Digital Bill of Rights" that would allow people to have more open conversations. I explore it in light of my thesis, which is the basis of my book The Weaponization of Loneliness.

Here's a link to my essay:


And here's an excerpt:

Intentionally or not, the enforcement of political correctness atomizes people.  The resulting isolation creates a vacuum for terror and social control. Americans must develop an awareness of this connection. It’s obvious from the history of totalitarian systems in which saying anything politically incorrect could land you in a Soviet gulag or put you at the mercy of Mao’s brutal Red Guard mobs. These are just two examples of many such recurring tragedies in human history. 

Furthermore, our loneliness epidemic both results from and contributes to the practice of self-censorship. Too often we self-silence in order to avoid social rejection for saying something that might be politically incorrect. This is a trap. Power elites use this fear of ostracism to enforce their narratives. They know instinctively that the human need to be accepted – coupled with the natural terror of social rejection – is a powerful driver of conformity. 

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